The strangest festivals in the world Rankings

There are many weird and wonderful festivals that take place each year around the world, for religious reasons, and purely for the sake of celebrating. Below are some of the strangest festivals in the world.

The carnival in Rio, Brazil

The carnival in Rio, which is held every year before Lent, is considered one of the greatest carnivals in the world. The main competition takes place between different Samba schools that compete for the best thematic platform and the most striking costumes of the dancers. The main parade takes place in the Sambadrome, through which pass the platform, but also balls take place at the Copacabana Palace and beach, as well as the many street festivals throughout Rio.

Diwali, India

Also known as the “Festival of lights” this one-day festival usually takes place between mid-October and mid-November and is celebrated in many countries. Overall this festival superiority of good over evil, light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance, but for Hindus, Sikhs and Jains, the festival has different religious values. Many houses, shops and public places are decorated with small clay lamps called “Diya”, launched fireworks, religious rituals are held and exchanged gifts.

Semana Santa, Guatemala

In order to honor Holy week in the city, throughout Guatemala spend a huge celebration with the participation of colourful parades, extravagant platforms, the burning of incense and intricate costumes. Antigua, where the festival begins on ash Wednesday and ends on Good Friday, boasts the most extravagant festival with the Catholic procession, which commemorates the life and death of Christ. Before the main procession, the streets are decorated with intricately woven with colorful carpets made of flowers, colored sawdust, and intricately carved fruit and vegetables.

Day Of The Dead, Mexico

Mexican holiday “Day of the Dead” focuses on collecting family and friends for prayers in memory of deceased friends and family members. The celebration takes place on the 1st and 2nd of November (All Saints ‘ Day and All souls Day) and traditions connected with the celebration including the building of private altars to honor the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, eating your favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with gifts.

Holi, India

Holi is a religious spring festival celebrated mostly by Hindus. The fires, which is also known as Holtedahl (burning little Holi), are lit on the eve of the feast in memory of the miraculous escape that made the young Prahlada, when demoness Holika took it with him into the fire. Holika was burnt but Prahlad began chanting the names of Vishnu and ran away, was not injured, thanks to the resilience of faith. The celebration can be held for 16 days, during which Hindus throw colored powder and water at each other on the streets.

Songkran Festival, Thailand

Songkran welcomes spring and the vernal equinox in Thailand and also in Cambodia, Burma and Laos. It begins April 13 and ends on April 15 and is a traditional New Year. The most famous celebration lasts for six days in the Northern city of Chiang Mai and the Thai people celebrate it, throwing each other and passersby with water. It also marks the end of the dry season in Thailand and the hottest time of the year.

Obon, Japan

The festival of Obon lasts for three days throughout Japan and is held usually in August. This is a Buddhist festival to honor the memory of ancestors, and it is celebrated by dancing Bon Odori, and a giant bonfire, which is lit on the hills of Kyoto. The festival is also known as the “festival of lanterns”, as one of the traditions of this festival is the administration of paper lanterns on the river as a symbol of the departed souls who come in peace to their graves.

Naadam Festival, Mongolia

In July in Mongolia is a celebration of the festival of Naadam festival (usually held between 11-13 number). This is the largest and most important festival of the year, when families of nomads from across the country gather in the major cities and villages for two days of competitions in traditional sports (wrestling, horse racing, archery).

Tsechu, Bhutan

Tsechu was integrated into the culture of Bhutan and is happening everywhere – from small, isolated villages to the largest dzongs in the country (monasteries). People travel across the country to celebrate and more and more of these colorful events attract visitors from around the world.

Tsechu is a wonderful way to gain experience and understanding of this unique culture. Despite what it is, big or small, more intimate festival you visit, you will be mesmerized by the captivating mix of sound, color and atmosphere. These great festivals are very popular, so they should plan for 9-12 months.

Festival Of The Perahera, Kandy, Sri Lanka

Festival Escala the Perahera in Kandy, which takes place every August – the most famous festival in Sri Lanka. One of the most sacred relics of the country, one of the teeth of the Buddha, is usually found in the temple town Davidmeshow, but during the festival, he paraded through the streets and accompanied with a huge amount of fanfare. The festival lasts ten days and is the representation involving elephants, drummers, dancers and chieftains, acrobats, torch bearers and thousands of pilgrims in the procession.

The Perahera is gradually becoming longer and more generous during the ten-day period and culminicola dazzling festival last night led a performance with the participation of hundreds of elephants and thousands of actors. The festival is just unprecedented in Sri Lanka and one of the best views on the Indian subcontinent.

The festival at Prodipan To Have, Burma

Conducted in and near standing stilt villages of Inle lake, the festival at a Pagoda Phaung To Do is one of the largest Buddhist festivals in Burma. The festival is held from the first day of the new moon until the third day of the full moon Thadingyut: September and October on our calendar.

The celebration continues for more than 20 days, when four of the five most revered faces Buddha carry around the lake to the elaborate, gilded barges pulling traditional long boats, managed by hundreds of oarsmen. Throughout the festival hosts competitions of rowing that is a wonderful idea.

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